Emotional Literacy Pocketbook

Provider: Teachers' Pocketbooks
£9.99 (no VAT on this item)

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Description Practical strategies to help pupils use emotional understanding to learn and grow.
Website

Teachers' Pocketbooks's website

https://www.teacherspocketbooks.co.uk/product/emotional-literacy-pocketbook/
Categories Primary, Secondary, Higher, Teaching and Learning, Further education, 14-19, KS1, KS2, KS3, KS4, Management, Support Staff, Teaching staff, Assistant Headteacher, CPD Leader, Deputy Headteacher, Headteacher, Head of year / Pastoral leader, Special Educational Needs Coordinator, Learning Support, Pupil Support, Other support staff, Advanced Skills Teacher, Excellent Teacher, Main-scale (core) teacher, Newly Qualified Teacher, Non-practising teacher, Post-threshold Teacher, Pupil mentor, Supply / Peripatetic teacher, Trainnee (pre-QTS) teacher, Teacher trainer, Head of Department / Faculty, Personal Development, Inclusion, Classroom Management, Out of school, In school, Online, After-school meetings, Physical resource, Book, e-Book, Webinar, Social and Emotional
Learning outcomes for participants/users and, where relevant, pupils or students

Ability to help pupils recognise, understand and handle emotions - their own and others, build their self-esteem and improve confidence. Will stimulate and reinvigorate those already familiar with the field.

Evidence underpinning this approach

Author James Park founded Antidote – an organisation working with schools to help shape emotional environments that give young people the best opportunity to learn and grow. He led the team that developed the Antidote Environment for Learning Survey (ELS), a research-validated tool for measuring emotional literacy and wellbeing.

He is currently PROGRESS Director at Human Scale Education. PROGRESS is a diagnostic tool and process for finding out how staff, students and parents experience a school's learning environment, and how they think it can become even better: http://www.progress-hse.org/about-progress/

James’s blog:

http://www.progresshse.org/category/blog/

 ‘reflects on our work with schools using PROGRESS, and also on the implications of policy news and research findings that are relevant to our mission of releasing the intelligence contained within schools about how to make even better learning environments.’

How users/participants can evaluate success

Use the 10 principles of emotional literacy as a checklist for monitoring how well you are applying them in your day to day work.

Consider a CLASI (p 20) questionnaire for your students before and after you apply what you learn from the Pocketbook.

Consider contacting the author about the PROGRESS diagnostic tool for finding out how staff, students and parents experience a school's learning environment, and how they think it can become even better: http://www.progress-hse.org/about-progress/

Follow-up activities and support

 

Investigate the 'useful organisations' on page 125 / explore some of the further reading on page 126

The authors James Park and Marilyn Tew are available for follow up training and he can be contacted at:

  •  Website: www.progress-hse.org
  • email:[email protected] uk
  • Tel: 020 7247 3355
Details

How to help pupils recognise, understand and handle emotions - their own and others' - build their self-esteem and improve confidence.

Shows you how to:

  • Understand better what's really going on for the young people in your class
  • Become more effective at providing what they need if they are to learn
  • Help them to grow, while at the same time looking after yourself

By defining emotional literacy as a set of a) skills and b) practices, you can both teach and learn it, and you can think beyond the individual to the bigger picture.

Suitable for those new to the field and for those with prior experience, this book is a strong introduction to emotional literacy, moving readers to a point where they can implement practical strategies in individual classes and across a school to begin to make a difference.